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https://soundcloud.com/humbert-valentin/the-best-of-kitaro

Attaining enlightenment

One Step at a time


visitheworld:

The Giant Buddha of Leshan in Sichuan / China (by MosaicPortrait).

visitheworld:

The Giant Buddha of Leshan in Sichuan / China (by MosaicPortrait).

visitheworld:

Baatara Gorge waterfall, Lebanon (via modernbasics).

visitheworld:

Baatara Gorge waterfall, Lebanon (via modernbasics).

visitheworld:

Cliffside path at Mount Sanqing in Jiangxi / China (by richard0428).

visitheworld:

Cliffside path at Mount Sanqing in Jiangxi / China (by richard0428).

visitheworld:

Horses in the rain at Sri Ranganathaswamy Temple / India (by nicnac1000).

visitheworld:

Horses in the rain at Sri Ranganathaswamy Temple / India (by nicnac1000).

tedx:

Calligraphy artist Tomoko Kawao makes words come alive on paper. Above, moments from her absolutely captivating performance at TEDxKyoto. Watch the whole performance here»

posted: 1 week ago (747 notes)
via: tedx | ori: tedx

wanderlusteurope:

Kahramanmaras, Turkey

wanderlusteurope:

Kahramanmaras, Turkey

theworldofchinese:

FLUENT BUDDHIST
Even if you don’t follow in the ways of the Siddhartha, there’s a lot people can learn from the tenets, language, and culture of Buddhism. Imported into China almost 2,000 years ago, there are 185 million Buddhists in China, and Buddhist vocabulary is deeply ingrained in the Chinese language.
Many words can make you sound more like a Buddhist. When you want to say “stupid”, instead of 愚蠢 (yúchǔn), you should say 愚痴 (yúchī), which makes the word sounds more sympathetic, as if the Buddha’s eyes are casting empathy on the stupidity of humanity. For those on a diet who want to say “I’m determined to lose 10 pounds”, say “我发愿减十磅” (Wǒ fāyuàn jiǎn shí bàng), giving the action a solemn tone. But if there is one Buddhist word you need to learn, it’s 无常 (wúcháng), essential to all Buddhist beliefs. It literally means unpredictable, but in a Buddhist context it means everything will die and nothing is permanent.
My house is going to be torn down.
Wǒ de fángzi yào bèi chāiqiān le.
我的房子要被拆迁了。
That’s how this world is, everything passes away.
Shìshì jiùshì zhème wúcháng a.
世事就是这么无常啊。
 
I was fired.
Wǒ bèi chǎo le.
我被炒了。
Let it go. It’s just a job. If you feel attached to anything in this ever-changing world, you are fated to suffer.
Fàngxià ba! Zhè zhǐshì gè gōngzuò. Rúguǒ nǐ zhízhuó yú zhège wúcháng de shìjiè shàng de rènhé dōngxi, jiù zhùdìng yào shòukǔ.
放下吧!这只是个工作。如果你执着于这个无常的世界上的任何东西,就注定要受苦。
The word 因果 (yīnguǒ, karma) is another frequently used word because it can be used to explain away all good and horrible in the world. 因果 literally means “causes and results”, but when it is used in a Buddhist context, it indicates a resigned attitude that puts everything in the hands of fate. It is often used together with 报应 (bàoyìng), which means basically the same thing.
Did you see the hit-and-run news? The police have no leads.
Nǐ kànle nà tiáo zhàoshì táoyì de xīnwén ma? Jǐngchá gēnběn zhuābúdào tā.
你看了那条肇事逃逸的新闻吗?警察根本抓不到他。
 
We are all creatures of our own karma. They will come face to face with their deeds one day.
Wǒmen dōu bēifùzhe zìjǐ de yīnguǒ. Tāmen chízǎo huì zāo dào bàoyìng de.
我们都背负着自己的因果。他们迟早会遭到报应的。
 
I won the lottery.
Wǒ zhòngjiǎng le.
我中奖了。
It must be karma. You must have done a lot of good things in your last life.
Yīnguǒ a! Nǐ zhè shì shàngbèizǐ xiū lái de fúfen.
因果啊!你这是上辈子修来的福分。
To speak like a more authentic Buddhist, you need to express how you’ve seen through life’s transitory nature; Remember to quote the Diamond Sutra:
All composed things are like a dream,
Or bubbles in a stream.
They vanish like the morning dew,
Or a streak of lightening across the sky.
Yíqiè yǒu wéi fǎ, rú mènghuàn pàoyǐng, rú lù yì rú diàn.
一切有为法,如梦幻泡影,如露亦如电。
If this is too much to take on, just remember 梦幻泡影 and compare everything in your life to it…
Continue Reading Here.

theworldofchinese:

FLUENT BUDDHIST

Even if you don’t follow in the ways of the Siddhartha, there’s a lot people can learn from the tenets, language, and culture of Buddhism. Imported into China almost 2,000 years ago, there are 185 million Buddhists in China, and Buddhist vocabulary is deeply ingrained in the Chinese language.

Many words can make you sound more like a Buddhist. When you want to say “stupid”, instead of 愚蠢 (yúchǔn), you should say 愚痴 (yúchī), which makes the word sounds more sympathetic, as if the Buddha’s eyes are casting empathy on the stupidity of humanity. For those on a diet who want to say “I’m determined to lose 10 pounds”, say “我发愿减十磅” (Wǒ fāyuàn jiǎn shí bàng), giving the action a solemn tone. But if there is one Buddhist word you need to learn, it’s 无常 (wúcháng), essential to all Buddhist beliefs. It literally means unpredictable, but in a Buddhist context it means everything will die and nothing is permanent.

My house is going to be torn down.

Wǒ de fángzi yào bèi chāiqiān le.

我的房子要被拆迁了。

That’s how this world is, everything passes away.

Shìshì jiùshì zhème wúcháng a.

世事就是这么无常啊。

 

I was fired.

Wǒ bèi chǎo le.

我被炒了。

Let it go. It’s just a job. If you feel attached to anything in this ever-changing world, you are fated to suffer.

Fàngxià ba! Zhè zhǐshì gè gōngzuò. Rúguǒ nǐ zhízhuó yú zhège wúcháng de shìjiè shàng de rènhé dōngxi, jiù zhùdìng yào shòukǔ.

放下吧!这只是个工作。如果你执着于这个无常的世界上的任何东西,就注定要受苦。

The word 因果 (yīnguǒ, karma) is another frequently used word because it can be used to explain away all good and horrible in the world. 因果 literally means “causes and results”, but when it is used in a Buddhist context, it indicates a resigned attitude that puts everything in the hands of fate. It is often used together with 报应 (bàoyìng), which means basically the same thing.

Did you see the hit-and-run news? The police have no leads.

Nǐ kànle nà tiáo zhàoshì táoyì de xīnwén ma? Jǐngchá gēnběn zhuābúdào tā.

你看了那条肇事逃逸的新闻吗?警察根本抓不到他。

 

We are all creatures of our own karma. They will come face to face with their deeds one day.

Wǒmen dōu bēifùzhe zìjǐ de yīnguǒ. Tāmen chízǎo huì zāo dào bàoyìng de.

我们都背负着自己的因果。他们迟早会遭到报应的。

 

I won the lottery.

Wǒ zhòngjiǎng le.

我中奖了。

It must be karma. You must have done a lot of good things in your last life.

Yīnguǒ a! Nǐ zhè shì shàngbèizǐ xiū lái de fúfen.

因果啊!你这是上辈子修来的福分。

To speak like a more authentic Buddhist, you need to express how you’ve seen through life’s transitory nature; Remember to quote the Diamond Sutra:

All composed things are like a dream,

Or bubbles in a stream.

They vanish like the morning dew,

Or a streak of lightening across the sky.

Yíqiè yǒu wéi fǎ, rú mènghuàn pàoyǐng, rú lù yì rú diàn.

一切有为法,如梦幻泡影,如露亦如电。

If this is too much to take on, just remember 梦幻泡影 and compare everything in your life to it…

Continue Reading Here.

thescientistofpoeticjustice:

The Harmandir Sahib (Golden Temple) at Amritsar, India

thescientistofpoeticjustice:

The Harmandir Sahib (Golden Temple) at Amritsar, India

vespasiana asked: First off, I just want to say that I love your blog so so so so much and I really deeply admire the work you do and I'm so thankful that you keep at it and inspire others (including myself) to do the same. Second, I was wondering (since you have plugged stuff about POC in fiction before) if you were aware of any blogs specifically about POC in speculative fiction/scifi (aka POC in the future in contrast to your POC in the past theme). Thanks!

medievalpoc:

There are a bunch, actually. Diversity in YA, Afrofuturist Affair, SciFi Women of Color, but there are also a lot of lists and masterposts that go around, including many you’ll find in my books tag.

Here are some external sources I grabbed from robotsquid’s page:

Recommended Reading:  People of Color in Fantasy Literature

POC Authors and Protagonists in Science Fiction & Fantasy

POC in Fantasy/Sci-Fi Novels

Diversity Roll Call Roundup:  POC in Sci-Fi & Fantasy

Popular Fantasy With POC Protagonist Books

Anyone can feel free to add more recommendations to this post with your faves.

studyhack:

Things to keep in mind when learning a foreign language

studyhack:

Things to keep in mind when learning a foreign language